71st Yokozuna Kakuryu Retires, Announces Elder Name

After 5 consecutive tournaments absent due to various injuries, Yokozuna Kakuryu has decided to retire from competition. The 6 time Emperor’s Cup champion had sought a 7th before pulling out of the current Spring basho. He will remain in the sumo association, addressed as Kakuryu-oyakata. Kakuryu, born Anand Mangaljalav in his native Mongolia, was takenContinue reading “71st Yokozuna Kakuryu Retires, Announces Elder Name”

Hakuho and Kotoshoho Join Kakuryu on Sidelines

Undefeated so far at the Spring Grand Sumo Tournament, Yokozuna Hakuho’s day 2 win against M1 Takarafuji came at a price. Takarafuji went chest to chest with the Yokozuna, securing a dominant right inside belt grip after the initial scuffle. Unable to reciprocate on his outmatched opponent’s belt, Hakuho took a brief pause at centerContinue reading “Hakuho and Kotoshoho Join Kakuryu on Sidelines”

Kakuryu is Japanese! | Hakuho Challenges Takakeisho

Mongolian-born Yokozuna Kakuryu has attained Japanese citizenship, a prerequisite for holding elder stock in the Japan Sumo Association. He of course has the option to continue competing, but with 15 years worth of professional level wear-and-tear, and pressure from the Yokozuna Deliberation Council to produce results or quit, it seems the main thing holding himContinue reading “Kakuryu is Japanese! | Hakuho Challenges Takakeisho”

“I wanted to reach the top this way” Takakeisho’s Push for Yokozuna

Having taken only half a week of complete rest after the basho, November champion Ozeki Takakeisho has already been back at it in a newly-named Tokiwayama Stable’s training hall. On Tuesday, he worked up a sweat with some basic exercises before taking questions over the phone. “I want to see what level I can takeContinue reading ““I wanted to reach the top this way” Takakeisho’s Push for Yokozuna”

November Banzuke

We are less than two weeks away from the last honbasho of 2020! Taking place in Tokyo instead of the usual Fukuoka Kokusai Center, spectator capacity in the Ryogoku Kokugikan will be increased to around 5000 seats, double the previous tournament. Aside from bold moves by the sumo association, the newly released rankings chart promisesContinue reading “November Banzuke”

Both Yokozuna to Take September Off

Two days before the beginning of Aki Basho, both current Yokozuna submitted doctor’s notes to the sumo association, withdrawing from the tournament. This will be the first time in 37 years that two or more active Yokozuna will not compete from day one. The last time this happened was at Natsu Basho 1983, when bothContinue reading “Both Yokozuna to Take September Off”

No Yokozuna Left at July Basho, Title Race Narrows

The remaining Yokozuna, Hakuho, is withdrawing from day 13 of Shichigatsu Basho (July tournament) in Tokyo. The cause is a meniscus and patellofemoral ligament injury in the right knee, as well as some arthritis. The treatment is expected to take two weeks, suggesting he, like the others who have already exited, probably will not beContinue reading “No Yokozuna Left at July Basho, Title Race Narrows”

Hakuho Remains Cautious, Takakeisho Resumes Full Contact Training

On the 27th, Yokozuna Hakuho relayed information on his current condition and state of mind with this month’s Natsu Basho having been canceled, and over a month and a half to prepare for the relocated July tournament. On Tuesday, Takakeisho also gave details on his progress. “While we battle the unseen virus, I have hadContinue reading “Hakuho Remains Cautious, Takakeisho Resumes Full Contact Training”

Kakuryu Proud Father of Three

Taking part in NHK’s “Special Basho” broadcast from a remote location, Yokozuna Kakuryu announced his second daughter (third child) was born this past April. The proud father fielded questions from NHK announcer Ota Masahide during the end of the program. “Last month, in the midst of these difficult times, my third child was born. I’veContinue reading “Kakuryu Proud Father of Three”

Learning Japanese Spirit from a Hawaiian, a Novice Reporter Meets Akebono

With the current state of emergency in Japan, the sports world continues to observe self restraint. While games are on hold, Nikkan Sports is giving sports reporters a chance to look back on some significant memories they’ve made through the years. Today in Nikkan’s “My Memories as a Sports Reporter,” Imamura Kento recalls his firstContinue reading “Learning Japanese Spirit from a Hawaiian, a Novice Reporter Meets Akebono”